Bonner Springs girls wrestling at Leavenworth Inaugural tourney

Bonner Springs sophomore Olivia Stean dragged Leavenworth’s Kennedie Miller to the mat in championship match of the 170-pound class at the Leavenworth Inaugural Girls Challenger tournament. Stean won the match by fall in the first round and went 4-0 in the tournament. (Photo copyright 2021 by Brian Turrel)

by Brian Turrel

The Bonner Springs girls’ wrestling team competed Saturday in the Leavenworth Inaugural Girls Challenger tournament. The team took 3rd place of 17 teams competing in the tournament.

Since KSHSAA voted in 2019 to sanction girls’ wrestling, Bonner Springs has rapidly built up its program.

Longtime youth club coach Dale Taylor is now the head coach of the Lady Braves team and has already recruited a roster with wrestlers in 10 of 12 weight classes. Taylor has a mix of successful club team veterans and rookies getting their first experience with competitive wrestling.

Nationally ranked sophomore Olivia Stean took 1st place in the 170-pound weight class in impressive style, winning all four of her matches by fall (that is, pinning her opponent) and averaging less than 36 seconds to do it.

Multi-sport athlete Jenna Knight placed 2nd in the 120-pound weight class. Kylie Enriquez placed 3rd in the 109-pound class. Sisters Haylie and Chloie Knapp took 3rd place in the 132- and 155-pound classes.

The Bonner Springs girls will face off in a dual meet against Manhattan on Thursday in Bonner Springs.

Turner High School also entered the meet, with a limited roster. Arianna Ortiz took 2nd place in the 101-pound class, and Daisy Chavez placed 7th in the 155-pound class. Turner placed 12th in the team competition.

Turner’s Arianna Ortiz defeated Raymore-Peculiar’s Courtney Stevens by fall in the first round of their 101-pound match. (Photo copyright 2021 by Brian Turrel)

 

The referee signalled Jenna Knight’s win over Olathe South’s Meriel Brady. Knight won by fall in the first round. (Photo copyright 2021 by Brian Turrel)

 

Bonner Springs sophomore Chloie Knapp wrestled St. Joseph Lafayette’s Mati Womeldorff. Knapp won by decision 6-0. (Photo copyright 2021 by Brian Turrel)

 

Olivia Stean posed with her mom Laura after the awards ceremony. (Photo copyright 2021 by Brian Turrel)

 

Turner’s Arianna Ortiz, left, posed with 101-pound class winner Isa-Bella Mendoza of St. Joseph-Lafayette. (Photo copyright 2021 by Brian Turrel)

 

Turner’s Daisy Chavez wrestled against Leavenworth’s Jacqueline Goodman. Goodman won the match by fall in the first round. (Photo copyright 2021 by Brian Turrel)

 

Bonner Springs junior Jaycee Millison tried to pin Kendall Reid of Washburn Rural. Reid won the match by major decision (14-2). (Photo copyright 2021 by Brian Turrel)

 

Jaycee Millison got some encouragement from coach Dale Taylor after a match. (Photo copyright 2021 by Brian Turrel)

 

Bonner Springs senior Haylie Knapp threw Lawrence Free State’s Ryan Turk in their 132-pound match. Knapp won by fall in the first round. (Photo copyright 2021 by Brian Turrel)

 

Bonner Springs junior Gina Acevedo defeated Mission Valley’s Jenna Grame by fall in the third round of their 191-pound match. (Photo copyright 2021 by Brian Turrel)

 

Bonner Springs freshman Kylie Enriquez dropped Raymore-Peculiar’s Ashland Kudron. Kudron won the match on a 9-7 decision. (Photo copyright 2021 by Brian Turrel)

Saint Mary launches scholarship program for future investors

The University of Saint Mary, Leavenworth, is launching a full-ride scholarship program for students interested in learning how to invest and trade financial securities.

The program, known as the Spires Trading Team, will consist of five current USM students who will trade securities on a daily basis during the 2021-2022 academic year under the oversight of Kevin Fox, former managing director at the D.E. Shaw Group, and Harold Bradley, former chief investment officer of the Kauffman Foundation. Any proceeds from the team’s efforts will be used to support Spires Trading Team activities and scholarships.

The new Spires Trading Team program provides USM students with real-world experience while they earn their degrees.

“The University of Saint Mary is excited to offer this hands-on opportunity for our students to learn trading strategies from local experts,” University President Sister Diane Steele said. “The Spires Trading Team is a win-win for our students. Investing real money will give our students a competitive advantage in their careers and will provide additional opportunities to apply the skills they are learning in the classroom. This unique partnership extends USM’s mission of helping students realize their God-given potential.”

The Spires Trading team will focus on investment theory, fund and risk management, and hands-on trading strategies. The program is open to USM seniors, juniors, and qualified second-semester sophomores. The five selected students will receive a scholarship that covers tuition, housing, and meal plans at the university’s main campus in Leavenworth.

Phil Watlington, USM accounting program director and assistant professor, will serve as a coach of the Spires Trading Team. Nicole Hess-Escalante, chair of the USM Division of Business and Information Technologies and associate professor, will provide direction and oversee academic integration of the program.

Students interested in joining the Spires Trading Team for the 2021-2022 academic year can apply at stmary.edu/trading-team. An initial review of applications will begin Aug. 1.

Post-Civil War photo negatives document African- American Exodusters building new lives in Leavenworth

In the turbulent years following the Civil War, around 27,000 former slaves migrated to Kansas. They called themselves “exodusters” and they were fleeing Jim Crow laws. Some of them are remembered in a portrait exhibition of an African-American community in Leavenworth, Kansas.

by Julie Denesha, KCUR and Kansas News Service

Photographer E.E. Henry’s portrait of Samuel Green, 1880 and an unknown photographer’s portrait of Geraldine Jones, 1870s-1900s. Glass plate negatives photographed in Leavenworth, Kansas, from the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas.
Unknown photographer’s portrait of James Turner circa 1895 and photographer Harrison Putney’s portrait of Private Paul Schrader of Ottawa, Kansas, and three soldiers from the 23rd Volunteer Infantry circa 1895-1899. Glass plate negatives photographed in Leavenworth, Kansas, from the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas.
Unknown photographer’s portrait of H. Hopkins children and an unknown photographer’s portrait of Thomas Meadows circa 1890. Glass plate negatives photographed in Leavenworth, Kansas, from the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas.
Photographer’s studios lined Delaware Street, in the early days of Leavenworth, Kansas. Everyday people rushed to take advantage of the new technology that could produce an image within minutes. This enlargement of a negative from the Everhard collection shows the studios of Jay Noble and E.E. Henry.

Photo studios were busy places in Leavenworth, Kansas, in the late 1870s. Thousands of everyday people flocked to have their pictures taken.

Today, some of those pictures have re-emerged — and they tell a story of an African-American community that took root in the town as Black families migrated to escape the Jim Crow south.

An exhibit on display at the Black Archives Museum in St. Joseph, Missouri, features a series of black-and-white portraits that have survived more than a century. (https://www.stjosephmuseum.org/black-archives-museum)

An older man and woman are decked out in their Sunday best. A quartet of soldiers poses in front of a woodsy backdrop. A young woman in a black hat looks boldly into the camera lens. All of the subjects are African-American.

Jade Powers is assistant curator of art at the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art. She takes a special interest in highlighting artists and subjects underrepresented in museum collections. (Photo by Julie Denesha)

Jade Powers, assistant curator of art at the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, wasn’t involved in the creation of the exhibit, but she takes a special interest in highlighting artists and subjects underrepresented in museum collections.

“So often, the portrayals before were not maybe how African-Americans saw themselves or they were very political in a negative way to keep, you know, a certain status quo. And so with these images, it’s so exciting,” Powers said.

“I mean, you’re looking at couples, you’re looking at soldiers. It just really expands on the history of America.”

In the turbulent years following the Civil War, around 27,000 former slaves migrated to the land of John Brown. They called themselves “Exodusters” and they were refugees from Jim Crow laws and lynch mobs. Their journey came to be known as the “Great Exodus.”

“There seems to be a real interest from Black and Brown artists, to really look at historical figures and reimagine them or be able to uplift them in different ways,” Powers said. “I am not a practicing artist, but I imagine someone could have a field day with stories of these people taken from this historical narrative.”

Volunteer Mary Ann Brown, left, and Samantha Poirier, director of the Leavenworth County Historical Society, flipped through enlargements from negatives saved by Mary Everhard at the Carroll Mansion Museum. (Photo by Julie Denesha)

The photos would never have come to the public eye if not for the persistence of Mary Everhard, a photographer who moved to Leavenworth in the 1920s.

Everhard had a keen interest in history. As older photographers closed their doors, she bought up their archives.

Eventually, her collection took up an entire room, floor to ceiling, 40,000 negatives in all. Everhard guarded them for years, through two tornadoes, a flood and a fire.

“It’s such an incredible story,” said Mary Ann Brown, a volunteer at the Leavenworth County Historical Society “It’s hard to know even where to start with Miss Everhard.”

Brown is part of a team that’s been scanning Everhard’s negatives since 1998. She considers Everhard a folk hero — the woman who preserved decades of early Leavenworth history. But people didn’t always appreciate Everhard’s efforts.

Mary Ellen Everhard studied photography in New York City before moving to the Midwest in the 1920s to set up a studio in Leavenworth, Kansas. (Photo from Leavenworth County Historical Society)

“When she decided to retire, she went to the local banker and she wanted to know what she could get for these negatives,” Brown said. “And he said, Miss Everhard, you might as well just throw these in the Missouri River. They’re not worth anything.”

Thankfully, the negatives escaped a watery grave. A collector from Chicago purchased them in 1967. He sold off parts of the collection to different museums.

One of them was The Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas. Today the Carter keeps around 6,000 of Everhard’s negatives in temperature-controlled vaults. The portraits on display at St. Joseph’s Black Archives Museum come from that collection.

“Even though photography is often talked about as one of the more democratic art forms, that still took a certain amount of money and a certain amount of access and standing to have an image taken,” said Kristen Gaylord, the museum’s assistant curator of photographs.

“A lot of Black Americans didn’t have that right away after the end of slavery,” she noted. “So especially the 19th Century images, I would say, are unusual, which is why they’re so valuable to us.”

Gaylord sees Mary Everhard as a woman ahead of her time.

“Not only was she a successful female photographer at the time, but she’s also the one who saw the need to conserve all these negatives,” she said.

The Autry Museum of the American West in Los Angeles, California, also acquired a portion of the Everhard collection. In the late 1990s, the Leavenworth County Historical Society raised the funds to purchase 25,000 negatives from the Autry and return some of the images to the city where they started. They form the heart of the historical society’s photography collection — the one that Brown and fellow volunteers have been working on for years.

Thanks to Mary Everhard, the Chicago collector and those volunteers, the images that could have landed in the Missouri River now tell a story about early Leavenworth and the people who called it home.

And the exhibit at the Black Archives Museum in St. Joseph tells us that the story includes former Black residents of the South, who put down new roots in the state of Kansas.

Julie Denesha is a freelance multimedia journalist based in Kansas City. Contact her at julie@kcur.org.
The Kansas News Service is a collaboration of KCUR, Kansas Public Radio, KMUW and High Plains Public Radio focused on health, the social determinants of health and their connection to public policy.
Kansas News Service stories and photos may be republished by news media at no cost with proper attribution and a link to ksnewsservice.org.
See more, including more historic photos, at
https://www.kcur.org/arts-life/2021-02-20/post-civil-war-photo-negatives-document-african-americans-building-new-lives-in-leavenworth.